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How Culture Can Hurt your Small Business Productivity

Today’s companies, big and small, are often competing for employees with their culture.

 

Catered lunches, standing desks and beer o’clock — you get it.

 

Google and Amazon are known for their unbelievable campuses and elaborate employee perks. Many businesses fight to replicate these traits in the hopes of finding similar success.

 

Happy employees are 12% more productive. Plus, they’re bound to be more loyal and engaged in the business.

 

An inviting, comfortable workspace is an important part of any business. Happy employees are 12% more productive. Plus, they’re bound to be more loyal and engaged in the business.

 

But there is such thing as having too free of a culture, one that can potentially cause productivity issues.

 
 

Distraction Dilemma

 
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According to a recent survey by Grand & Toy, 72% of small and medium-sized business employees have at least one distraction at work.

 

Over 32% of them admit that the distraction isn’t lacking technology or poor management, but their fellow coworkers.

 

Whether it be strong smellers or loud talkers, coworkers are taking employees away from their work.

 

It takes the average person 25 minuteshttps://business.financialpost.com/entrepreneur/whats-the-no-1-factor-that-stalls-productivity-in-the-small-business-workplace-survey-says to get back to their task after being distracted.

 

If this happens three or four times a day to multiple employees — at least three people are dying to hear Sarah gossip about the sales department small business owners lose out on some serious productivity.

 
 

No More Talking?

 
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Small business owners need to be careful. If their company culture is too free, they risk having employees that aren’t working to their full potential. But if they prevent their workers from communicating, they risk talent turnover and dissent among the ranks.

 

Like all things, having a balance is key. But how can small business owners achieve that?

 
 

Remote Working

 

Working from home or from a local cafe has gained so much popularity in startup circles that it requires a whole article.

 

Naturally, there are distractions galore at home as well, but instead of the actions of your coworkers causing your distractions, it’d be you binging Youtube videos.

 

Knowing your employees can inform you on who would benefit from remote working, and who may need a little bit of oversight.

 
 

Headphones

 

Whether it’s podcasts or Prince, being able to use headphones can help your employees stay distraction-free. It actually improves productivity in some cases.

 

Let your employees listen to music and watch as their creativity flows. Who knows, they might end up creating the new big product.

 
 

Good Breaks

 

Even small business owners need a break sometimes. If your employees are checking their phone every minute, they’re likely in need of a break.

 

Breaks can seem counterproductive but they can help your employees refocus on their tasks.

 

Productivity is bound to increase and decrease throughout the calendar year, regardless of what you do as a small business owner.

 

Plus, reminding your employees to take their breaks makes you seem like an even better boss.

 

It’s a win-win situation.

 

Productivity is bound to increase and decrease throughout the calendar year, regardless of what you do as a small business owner.

 

However, that doesn’t mean you can’t try and control what you can to improve your workers’ productivity.